99% Sure | Ep 7: the Atlantic Logwood Trade (Season Finale)

Welcome to our Season 1 finale of “99% Sure”, a video series where we take a deeper dive into the legends, people, and events of Old North that sum up the significance of history as it ties to our present moment. Over the last 7 episodes, Old North’s Education Manager and intrepid public historian TJ

Welcome to our Season 1 finale of “99% Sure”, a video series where we take a deeper dive into the legends, people, and events of Old North that sum up the significance of history as it ties to our present moment. Over the last 7 episodes, Old North’s Education Manager and intrepid public historian TJ Todd explores some of our most frequently asked questions and gives light to more unique and unheard stories of Old North. This Episode: The Atlantic Logwood Trade and the Pervasiveness of Slavery.

“Understanding Old North’s ties to the Logwood Trade doesn’t negate the inspirational stories, and sharing the complexity doesn’t absolve us from past sins, either.” —TJ Todd

https://youtu.be/B2AvPV48ymU?list=PLRAiYG97mPx7pSDJ1O5sHK3nSOd6z4Nf-

Sources:

Bolland, O. Nigel. “Chapter 1: The Social Structure and Social Relations of the Settlement in the Bay of Honduras (Belize) in the 18th Century” and “Chapter 2: Slavery in Belize”. In Colonialism and Resistance in Belize: Essays in Historical Sociology, 17-56. Benque Viejo del Carmen: Cubola Productions, 2003. (Via Google Books)

Newton, Ross A. “”Good and Kind Benefactors”: British Longwood Merchants and Boston’s Christ Church.” Early American Studies 11, no. 1 (2013): 15-36. Accessed June 16, 2020. www.jstor.org/stable/23546700 *Note: Jstor misspells logwood in title, author does not seem to, though.

Offen, Karl. “British Logwood Extraction from the Mosquitia: The Origin of a Myth.” Hispanic American Historical Review, 80:1, February 2000. Published by Duke University Press. Accessed June 22, 2020. (This content has been declared free to read by the publisher during the COVID-19 pandemic.) https://muse.jhu.edu/article/12337/pdf

Restall, Matthew. “Crossing to Safety? Frontier Flight in Eighteenth-Century Belize and Yucatan.” Hispanic American Historical Review, 94:3, 2014. Published by Duke University Press. Accessed June 24th, 2020.

Camille, Michael A., and Rafael Espejo-Saavedra. “Historical Geography of the Belizean Logwood Trade.” Yearbook. Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers 22 (1996): 77-85. Accessed June 17, 2020. www.jstor.org/stable/25765830.

Rossano, Geoffrey L. “Down to the Bay: New York Shippers and the Central American Logwood Trade, 1748-1761.” New York History 70, no. 3 (1989): 229-50. Accessed June 19, 2020. www.jstor.org/stable/43460260.

Newton, Ross. “Logwood Cutters, Merchants, Privateers… Religious Gents?” Commonplace: the journal of early American life, accessed July 2, 2020, http://commonplace.online/article/log…

Kunkel, Robin. “Logwood – A History of Palettes, Pirates, and Pathology”. Accessed July 2, 2020. https://www.pathology.med.umich.edu/n…

Mayr, Renate Johanna. Belize: Tracking the Path of Its History, 105-150. Berlin: LIT Verlag Münster, 2014. (Via Google Books).

Joseph, Gilbert M. “British Loggers and Spanish Governors: The Logwood Trade and Its Settlements in the Yucatan Peninsula: Part I.” Caribbean Studies 14, no. 2 (1974): 7-37. Accessed July 2, 2020. www.jstor.org/stable/25612609.

Special thanks to TJ Todd, Em Benoit, Erin Wederbrook Yuskaitis, and Catherine Matthews.

0 0
Feed

Leave a comment