Serving As Collections Intern At Old North

After almost 300 years of existence, an institution is bound to accumulate an interesting collection of objects. 

By Jessica Nelson

 

After almost 300 years of existence, an institution is bound to accumulate an interesting collection of objects.  And having interned over the summer with the Old North Foundation, I can certainly confirm that this is a fact.  I was brought in to be the first Collections Intern to work with the site, and as such had the opportunity to scour the site’s attic, basement, and many rooms.  My responsibility was to document the works of art found within Old North’s campus.  Although Old North is not what one would call a collecting institution, it is an historical site that has over time accumulated, often through generous donations from parishioners, a number of interesting and some valuable art pieces.  One of the best ways to honor these donations and other acquisitions is through careful preservation.

 

Even though Old North’s art is not currently shown to the public in a crafted exhibition, it is visible throughout the Foundation and Church offices as well as in parts of the church itself.  So as a student learning about the museum field, I was able to apply some of the museum world’s techniques when documenting the artworks at Old North.  What exactly does that entail though?  Well, I began by numbering the objects and creating condition reports for each one. These reports allowed me to describe the art piece detailing its materials and what it looks like as well as identifying if there is any damage to the piece.  Creating these reports helps an institution keep track of the object and monitor how it holds up over time.  After making condition reports for every object, I then took pictures of the objects as well.  Attaching pictures to the condition reports is another means of recording an object’s condition and can help people who may work with these objects in the future more easily identify them.

 

The Foundation then ordered special archival papers and pens so that I could physically attach the identifying number I had given each object to the object in question.  It is important to use archival quality goods as this helps ensure the marking materials won’t damage the art piece over time.  I also had the opportunity to conduct some early research on the objects and how they came to Old North.  Although many of the art pieces’ stories have been somewhat lost over time, there were a few active members of the church who were quite helpful in recovering their histories.  All in all, the project went quite well, and hopefully the work I completed with the help of the Old North Foundation staff will serve as a good base for any future artwork they receive and help insure that all of their art is well preserved for future generations.

 

Jessica is currently a graduate student earning her masters degree in Museum Studies at Tufts University.

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